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“My doctor will support me.”

This is one of the most common expressions heard from clients dealing with an ERISA long-term disability insurance claim. Disability claimants know, perhaps without formal recognition, that their disability insurance claim requires a solid evidentiary foundation. Most claimants realize they carry the burden to prove their claim and recognize that a claim requires medical proof – not merely a statement of one’s inability to work. In fact, most of our clients recognize this immediately, even before meeting with us. A disability claimant’s treating physician will likely play the most important evidentiary role in a disability claim, as they are the one providing at least the baseline medical foundation to support a claimant’s contention that they are occupationally disabled.

While disability plan insurers are not bound to accept a treating physician’s opinions without scrutiny, “plan administrators, of course, may not arbitrarily refuse to credit a claimant’s reliable evidence, including the opinions of a treating physician.”  Black & Decker Disability Plan v. Nord, 538 U.S. 822, 834 (2003).

What is important for not just disability claimants but also their physicians to understand is the integral role treating physicians play in a disability claim, and how to successfully navigate that interdependent relationship as it moves from providing treatment to providing evidence.  Below are a few suggestions for consideration toward understanding and enhancing these critical relationships.

1)            Establish a Trusted Relationship.   First, it is important to let your doctor know about your disability claim and keep them updated on its status. Most treating physicians are familiar with disability claims and are willing to help their patients through the process. It is best to tell your physician, up front, that you are filing a claim and are likely to need some help with the claim forms. You may also want to use this as an opportunity to thank your physician for his or her anticipated cooperation and to communicate that you will try not to impose too much.

Some physicians do refuse to be a part of the disability application or appeal process. If your physician is unwilling to assist, do not be upset – it is better to know, preferably as early as possible. Nothing is worse than sending Attending Physician forms to a doctor whose office says they refuse to deal with insurance companies. While unhelpful, this position is somewhat understandable since paperwork is time-consuming and often uncompensated. In our experience, physicians work extremely hard and their compensation, often dictated by insurance companies, is below their fair value. They simply may not be able to financially perform this extra work.  (Note: your disability insurer knows this).

2)            Consider A Referral to A Specialist.  Depending on your condition, you may need to consult a specialist.  Again, timing is critical.  Specialists can book appointments three to four months out.  You need to consult, begin treatment with, and then, once the relationship is established, enlist their assistance. When it comes to the requirement for submitting “proof of disability” or “proof of claim,” sometimes more is required than the findings of a family doctor or internist. Here, the medical examination is centered on establishing one’s functional abilities. A treating physician may be fully capable of assessing the patient’s condition. For others, a specialist such as a Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R) doctor may be appropriate.

3)            Allow the Physician Plenty of Time to Respond.  All claims forms have a due date, so don’t delay.  These forms are sometimes ambiguous and confusing – if there is any confusion over what is being requested, you may want to consider hiring counsel since even a minor mistake on a form can exponentially complicate the claims process or even lead to a denial.  That said, the forms should be in the hands of the doctors as soon as reasonably possible. The forms should also be reviewed after completion by a physician but before return to the insurance company.  A mistake or misunderstanding can add as much as one year of delay in resolving a valid claim.

Given the importance of these forms, a claimant should be considerate of a physician’s time and understand that a physician is typically not compensated for efforts toward supporting a disability claim.  Most physicians will help with a claim as an act of professional courtesy.  We have written about this previously.  See, Do You Have An ERISA Disability Claim? Print This Article, And Take It To Your Doctor.

4)            Be Willing to Compensate the Physician for Administrative Time. This is self-explanatory.  Politely inquire whether the physician is typically compensated for filling out forms and be willing to pay all reasonable charges.

5)            Explain that the Physician’s Involvement Will Be Minimal – No Depositions or Trial.

This is perhaps the most important and often overlooked part of an ERISA disability claim.  Most physicians are familiar with accident cases and workers compensation cases, yet lack familiarity with ERISA disability case. This presents a slight problem when physicians mistakenly believe they may be “called to testify” if they provide a professional opinion on a claimant’s medical and/or functional status. In practice, however, ERISA does not provide for trials, depositions, or live testimony.  At most, the physician will be asked (usually by the claimant’s lawyer) to supply a sworn statement or medical narrative.  This is part of a written submission or appeal for the claimant.  A physician will not be called to testify in a deposition or trial in an ERISA case.

In the Sixth Circuit (Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennessee), there is a special “framework” for resolving disability cases, allowing federal courts to conduct a “review based solely upon the administrative record and render findings of fact and conclusions of law accordingly.”  Wilkins v. Baptist Healthcare System, Inc., 150 F.3d 609, 619 (6th Cir. 1998).  This means that cases are decided on written submissions such as motions. While Wilkins did recognize that there are times when discovery is appropriate against an insurer or plan administrator, this does not include depositions of the treating physician.[1]

Bottom Line:      Establish a strong and courteous relationship with all treating physicians.

Explain to your physicians your need for their assistance with your claim.

Be willing to pay all reasonable charges for any administrative work, including completion of forms and preparation of medical narratives.

Don’t Delay!

[1] For more information about the Wilkins review process, see, see, John J. Conway & Trever M. Sims, Refining Wilkins: A 20-Year Look at the Recurring Factors Used in the Sixth Circuit’s Resolution of Disability Claims Under ERISA Section 502(a)(1)(B), Sec. II.B, WMU-Cooley Law (2018), available at: https://issuu.com/cooleylawschool/docs/wmu-cooleylawreview-34-2/94.